Research – Plagiarism

 

                                      What is Plagiarism

 All of the following are considered plagiarism: 

  • turning in someone else’s work as your own
  • copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit
  • failing to put a quotation in quotation marks
  • giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation
  • changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit
  • copying so many words or ideas from a source that it makes up the majority of your work, whether you give credit or not (see our section on “fair use” rules)

Most cases of plagiarism can be avoided, however, by citing sources. Simply acknowledging that certain material has been borrowed, and providing your audience with the information necessary to find that source, is usually enough to prevent plagiarism.” MORE Plagiarism FAQs.

SOURCE:  What is Plagiarism? (n.d.) Retrieved Dec. 16,2010, from <http://www.plagiarism.org/learning_center/what_is_plagiarism.html>

                                Fort Hays’ policy on Honesty

(From the University catalog)

FHSU Academic Honesty Policy and Procedures

 

                                   Interactive Tutorial on Plagiarism

 The penalties for plagiarism can range from  a low grade to failing the class or even expulsion from the university.  Learn how to identify and correct such mistakes by using this tutorial:

                                          Interactive Plagiarism Tutorial

Created by librarians at Vaughan Memorial Library at Acadia University. Used by permission.

 

                                      Who me?  Plagiarize?

You may be plagiarising without realizing it.  Plagiarism isn’t only obvious theft such as buying a paper off the web or copying and pasting entire papers.  Failing to properly cite the source of the words and ideas you use in your paper also constitutes plagiarism. 

Plagiarism is theft of someone’s words or ideas.  “Plagiarism is pretending that an idea is yours when in fact you found it in a source.  You can therefore be guilty of plagiarism even if you thoroughly rewrite the source’s words.  One of the goals of education is to help you work with and credit the ideas of others.  When you use another’s idea, whether from a book, a lecture, a Web page, a friend’s paper, or any other source, and whether you quote the words or restate the idea in your own words, you must give that person credit with a citation.”

Harris, Robert A.  Appendix. The Plagiarism Handbook:  Strategies for Preventing, Detecting, and Dealing with Plagiarism. Pyrczak Publishing:  Los Angeles, California,  2001. 132-133.

LH

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