AND NOW…IT’S TIME FOR A COMMERCIAL!

How many times have you heard that before and you’re saying, “What?  How can they do that?  Right during the best part of the show!”

Well, excuse me, but I’d just like to interrupt your show (or whatever else is going on in your life) to introduce you to a few current sources in the Reference Collection that may make your “research” life a little easier.

We have a lot of books that deal with current issues such as Popular Culture (HM621/.P654/2011); The Middle East Peace Process (DS119.76/.M466/2011); Student Life (LA216/.S783/2011); Cosmetic Surgery (RD119/.C6816/2011); The United Nations (JZ4984.5/.U5355/2011); Deregulation (HD3616/.U47/D425/2011); and War Crimes (K5301/.W3673/2011).

Some current health materials we’ve received include Obesity (RA645/.O23/O22/2011; Sexually Transmitted Diseases (RA644/.V4/S36795/2011); ALA Guide to Medical & Health Sciences Reference (R118.4/.U6/A43/2011); and Mosby’s Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference (RB38.2/.P337/2011).

Some other new history references are The Forties in America (E169.12/.F676/2011); American Decades 2000-2009 (E169.12/.A419/2011); and Iran (JZ1480/.A57/I7/2011).

New business materials that are now on our shelves include Tax Reform (HJ2381/.T384/2011); Reforming Wall Street (HB3722/.R427/2011); and Unemployment (HD5724/.U593/2011).

…And other reference books too numerous to mention are just waiting for you to discover them!

I will now return you to your regularly scheduled program.                 J.A.S.

Fort Hays Trivia for Veterans Day

In honor of Veterans Day, Friday, November 11, I have some trivia questions. Fort Hays State President William A. Lewis (1913-1933) was a history buff, and he named several buildings  for historical figures. See if you know who they are and which building was named for them. I have provided some links below from a library database which provide some information.

  1. Which campus building was named for a man who took part in the Battle of the Arickaree (or more commonly known as the Battle of Beecher Island)?
  2. Which campus building was named for the wife of a man who was a lieutenant colonel at Fort Hays in 1867?
  3. Which campus building was named for a General who was known for his hostile views towards the Indians and directed campaigns against the Southern Plains Indians and the Sioux Indians?

This is a picture of a train car that is now housed at the Hays American Legion, 13th and Canterbury. The car was one of many “40 & 8” trains that had been used in World War I and World War II to transport American soldiers across France. After World War II ended, the Americans ran Friendship Trains throughout Europe beginning in 1947. These trains carried food and hope to the region that had been devastated by the war.

The French decided to give 49 of these cars to the United States as a thank you for to the Americans for Franco-American wartime cooperation and for the Friendship trains. A French “Merci” Train was sent to each state in the United States and was filled with gifts. The train for Kansas had its home in Hays, and it was on the campus from 1949 to 1975. It was located between McCartney and Albertson Halls, and had fallen into disrepair by the 1970’s. The American Legion asked if they could take it to restore to its original glory and place on their grounds.

To the veterans, we thank you for your service and sacrifice.

Answers can be found in these links, which can be viewed through Forsyth Library’s databases:

http://www.xreferplus.com/entry/americanwest/forsyth_george_alexander_1837_1915

http://www.xreferplus.com/entry/americanwest/beecher_s_island_battle_of_1868

http://www.xreferplus.com/entry/americanwest/custer_elizabeth_bacon_1842_1933

http://www.xreferplus.com/entry/americanwest/sheridan_philip_henry_1831_88

The answers to the questions are:

  1. Forsyth Library
  2. Custer Hall
  3. Sheridan Hall

pn

You Mean There’s Something Better Than Wikipedia?? Part 3

Another scholarly source of online reference books is a database called Oxford Reference Online.  It is available on our library website by clicking “Find Books” under the “Research” tab on the right side of the screen.  Next, click “Oxford Reference Online” on the following screen.  Key in a search term to find information on your topic or click “Subjects & Books” which will shows titles of reference books for a variety of subjects.  Like Credo Reference, citation information will be provided at the end of each entry.

 The following subjects and number of books available for that subject are now available in Oxford Reference Online: Art & Architecture (10); Bilingual Dictionaries (18); Biological Sciences (12); Classics (6); Computing (3); Earth & Environmental Sciences (9); Economics & Business (9); Encyclopedias (2); English Dictionaries & Thesauruses (10); English Language Reference (17); Food and Drink (4); History (32); Law (8); Literature (23); Maps & Illustrations (3); Medicine (11); Military History (6); Mythology & Folklore (9); Names & Places (5); Natural History (8); Performing Arts (13); Physical Sciences & Mathematics (9); Politics & Social Sciences (21); Pre-History (5); Quotations (5); Religion & Philosophy (13); and Science (42).

 Oxford Reference Online is updated at least three times a year with new titles or revised editions.  In the last update, 775 entries were updated and 103,900 new entries were added.

 Since Oxford Reference Online and Credo Reference each have their own collection of online reference books, you may want to check both sites for information.  ENJOY!                          J.A.S.

You Mean There’s Something Better Than Wikipedia?? Part 2

I hope that most of you have had the opportunity to use Credo Reference by now.  As you will recall, it is a database of 635 online reference books that has scholarly information.  If you want to use the information in a paper, click APA, MLA, Chicago, or Harvard format to see how it should be cited.

Since I had mentioned in the last blog entry that this database is continually being updated with new and updated sources, the following titles have just been added:

  • The 2011 Annual Register: World Events 2010
  • Animals: A Visual Encyclopedia
  • The Cambridge Guide to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
  • Cambridge Introductions to Philosophy: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language
  • Collins English-Greek Dictionary
  • Collins Greek-English Dictionary
  • Cultural Geography: A Critical Dictionary of Key Concepts
  • Dictionary of Trade Policy Terms
  • Eastern Europe: An Introduction to the People, Lands, and Culture
  • Encyclopedia of New Jersey
  • Encyclopedia of the American Civil War: A Political, Social, and Military History
  • The Environmental Debate: A Documentary History
  • Exemplary Economists: Europe, Asia, and Australasia
  • Exemplary Economists: North America
  • Globalization: Encyclopedia of Trade, Labor, and Politics
  • The Handbook of Political Sociology: States, Civil Societies, and Globalization
  • A History of Feminist Literary Criticism
  • A History of South African Literature
  • Key Concepts in Education
  • Key Concepts in Governance
  • Key Concepts in Nursing
  • Key Concepts in Public Health
  • Key Concepts in Social Research
  • The National Gallery Companion Guide
  • Pocket Guides: Myths & Legends
  • Pocket Guides: Narrative
  • Poverty and the Government in America: A Historical Encyclopedia
  • Slavery in the United States: A Social, Political, and Historical Encyclopedia

 Updates of the following titles have just been added and more will appear shortly.  They include:

  • Encyclopedia of the Vietnam War: A Political, Social, and Military History
  • The Hutchinson Chronology of World History
  • Martial Arts of the World: An Encyclopedia of History and Innovation

 Whether you’re looking for topics, people, dates, images, definitions, pronunciations, holidays/festivals, conversions, or even a crossword solver, Credo Reference is an excellent resource to use.  It even has “Topic Pages” which can be used as a one-stop shopping center for finding library information.  These pages have background information, journal articles, titles of books, images, videos, and related information for topics, people, places, events, etc.  So, if you haven’t had a chance to use Credo Reference, please take a few minutes to browse this user-friendly resource.  You’ll be glad you did!                                                                                              J.A.S.